Tampa Dog Trainer Brenna Fender: New Trainer and New Class at Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa!

lisaNew Trainer and New Class at Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa!

By Brenna Fender

Did you ever see a dog do some really cool tricks and think, “Wow, I’d love my dog to be able to do that”? Do you just know that your dog could do amazing tricks if you just knew how to teach him? Courteous Canine DogSmith of Tampa can help you do just that!

Certified trick dog trainer Lisa Morrissey will be bringing her trick training expertise to Courteous Canine DogSmith of Tampa this fall with a new trick training class. This class teaches handlers how to train their dogs to do basic tricks and how to build on them to create more elaborate tricks by luring, shaping, capturing and chaining tricks together. Through the class, owners learn how to teach their dogs enough tricks to earn a Novice Trick Dog title through a sanctioning organization called “Do More with Your Dog.”

What tricks could you learn to teach your dog in this class? Spin, leg weaves, figure eights, paws up, say your prayers, shake hands, wave, take a bow, jump though a hoop, soccer, wipe your feet, and more! Morrissey has extensive experience in training tricks and has won trick competitions with her rescued Border Collie, Brody, who has also appeared in television commercials and on the news. Learn more about Brody in his online resume here: http://brodythebordercollie.weebly.com/brodys-resume.html

Trick training is fun, but it also has lots of value for dogs that compete in dog sports or participate in family life. Teaching dogs tricks provides mental and physical stimulation and exercise, builds canine confidence, and improves the dog/owner bond.

For more information or to enroll in the class, contact info@CourteousCanine.com or visit our website www.CourteousCanine.com.

Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa offers dog training, puppy training, working with aggressive dogs and rehabilitating fearful and shy dogs.  In addition we offer cat training, agility, pushball, Fun Scent Games and dock jumping. Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa is a full service dog school that offers doggie day care, pet sitting, group classes and boarding!

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Tampa Dog Trainer Jan Casey: Congrats Dog Dock Jumping Student Oakley!

Oakley frist comp with momTampa Dog Trainer Jan Casey:

Congrats Dog Dock Jumping Student Oakley! 

Congratulations to Lane Martin and Oakley on their premier dock jumping trial at the Big Buck Expo at the fairgrounds in Tampa on July 12 and 13. Oakley is a chocolate lab rescued by Lane last year. At this trial, he demonstrated not only his drive and enthusiasm for the sport of dock jumping, but also the huge strides he has made in his ability to calmly watch from the sidelines as other dogs take their turns to jump. Oakley had his personal best jump of 18’11” – an awesome distance for any dog, let alone one who is in his first trial in a totally new competitive environment. We look forward to continuing to work with Oakley on increasing that distance as well as continuing to refine his skills of calm and focus on the dock. Great job Lane and Oakley!

Oakley first UA comp1

 

Come join the fun and sign up for a Dock Jumping Class at Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa today! Visit www.CourteousCanine.com

Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa offers dog training, puppy training, working with aggressive dogs and rehabilitating fearful and shy dogs.  In addition we offer cat training, agility, pushball, Fun Scent Games and dock jumping. Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa is a full service dog school that offers doggie day care, pet sitting, group classes and boarding!

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Tampa Dog Trainer: Dog Travel Safety

dog traveling

Dog Travel Safety is an important concern

Tampa Dog Trainer: Dog Travel Safety

By Brenna Fender

Dog owners often travel with their pets to competitions, on vacation, or just about town while on errands, but they may not realize that the way they travel can mean the difference between life and death.

Do you drive with Fido loose in the back seat or running around your RV?  Do you pile your gear on the passenger seat?  Things like these can make a big difference in the event of an accident.

The American Pet Products Manufacturers Association states that a 60-pound dog riding in a car traveling at 30 miles per hour becomes a projectile which can hit the windshield – or the driver – with the force of 1,200 pounds. While 82% of Americans wear their seatbelts, only a fraction secure their dog during car travel, which means that, in an accident, a canine companion can become a deadly missile. This endangers your dog, your passengers, and you.

Owners can travel much more safely by securing their dogs (and other loose objects) in their vehicle. One way to do this is by purchasing a crate. The safest crates are made of either hard plastic or metal.  There are pros and cons to each – plastic might be less strong, but metal wires may bend and injure a dog. Noted conformation handler, breeder, and American Kennel Club judge Pat Hastings says, “I believe that a quality fiberglass (plastic) crate is the safest way to travel with dogs. We have stopped at two accidents where the dogs were in wire crates and the impact of the accident broke the wires at the welds. Some of the dogs were killed by the wires and some were just injured but it was very difficult to remove the dogs as the wires were bent inward.” Ruff Tuff Kennels are the latest innovation in travel crate safety, designed specifically with car travel (and accidents) in mind. (Learn more at http://www.rufftoughkennels.com/)  Fabric crates, while better than nothing, provide far less protection than a solid crate.

Placing a crate in your vehicle isn’t enough to make your dog safe – that crate must be secured so that it doesn’t become a projectile in a crash. While the gold standard used to be to use bungee cords, ratchet straps and other methods are now considered to be better suited to assure that a crate will remain stationary.  Do not place loose objects in a crate during travel because these can strike the dog during an accident.

Another way to keep your dog safe is by using a specially-made seatbelt. A properly fitted belt will allow your dog to change positions but will keep animals from being thrown during an accident. Proponents of seatbelts believe that these are safer than crates because animals can impact the wall of a crate during rapid deceleration. However, seatbelts will not shelter a dog from projectiles like a crate will. If you’re purchasing a seatbelt, make sure it is crash-tested and guaranteed.  Recent tests have shown that many seatbelts are useless or downright dangerous in an accident (http://www.forbes.com/sites/hannahelliott/2013/10/28/the-best-seat-belts-for-your-dog/). The new crash-tested car seat might be a better bet for small dogs, but the product is very new. (http://www.mightymitedoggear.com/dog-supplies/crash-tested-dog-car-seats-pupsaver)  Other crash tested options can be found here: http://www.mightymitedoggear.com/mighty-mite/dog-care-travel-gear/car-accessories/safety-harnesses-dog-seat-belts. Be sure that dogs in vehicles are not seatbelted near airbags, which are dangerous for animals and small children.

Many of the crash-tested crates and seatbelts are very expensive and owners may think that there is no use trying to keep their dog safe if they can’t afford these options. But securing your dog in some way is very important to the safety of all involved, even if you have to do so with a garden-variety crate.

Don’t forget to secure your gear as well.  Collapsible chairs, spare crates, training bags, luggage, children’s toys, and other items can all be dangerous if an accident occurs.  Use straps to keep items stationary or pack them in stow away areas within the vehicle.

Other tips for safe travel involve keeping your dog’s head inside the vehicle, never allowing an animal to ride loose in the open bed of a truck, and never leaving any pet in a parked car. These situations are all documented risks to animal safety, with the potential for injury or death.

Many dogs are part of the family. When traveling, treat them like you would treat a family member. Make sure that your dogs are safe and secure.

A version of this article first appeared on USDAA.com.

Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa offers dog training, puppy training, working with aggressive dogs and rehabilitating fearful and shy dogs.  In addition we offer cat training, agility, pushball and dock jumping. Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa is a full service dog school that offers doggie day care, pet sitting, group classes and boarding!

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Tampa Dog Trainer Angelica Steinker: Helpful Pet Insurance Information

Dog secretHelpful Pet Insurance Information 

It can be hard to find helpful pet insurance information, so today we are sharing a link to a huge chart listing many of the pet insurance companies and presenting a list of client ratings of these companies.  Check it out. 

http://www.petinsurancereview.com/dog.asp

Happy Pet Insurance Shopping, The Staff of Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa! 

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Tampa Dog Trainer Brenna Fender: The ABCs of Canine Freestyle

Stevie Leg Weave webThe ABCs of Canine Freestyle

By Brenna Fender

A dog sport that combines obedience moves, tricking training, and dancing: that’s canine freestyle!

Breeds that are good for canine freestyle include… all of them! Because routines are varied, you can showcase your dog’s strong points, whether he is a Beagle or a Border Collie. A strong working relationship and good partnership with the handler are more important than breed.

Canine Freestyle Federation is one of several organizations that sanction canine freestyle events. Their mission statement, in part, is “The Canine Freestyle Federation, Inc. (CFF) is an international organization dedicated to defining and developing the sport of Canine Freestyle and providing the structure necessary to offer competitions and demonstrations.” Read the rest of it at their website: http://canine-freestyle.org/.

Dogs Can Dance is another canine freestyle organization. It offers titling opportunities, not competitions. They offer the Dogs Can Dance Challenge, which has the following mission statement: “Dogs Can Dance Challenge®, a division of Dogs Can Dance® was founded to promote the art and sport of canine freestyle, worldwide, by offering musical canine freestyle titling opportunities. The premise of the Dogs Can Dance Challenge® is based on the following concept; each performance should honor and showcase the dog by emphasizing the beauty and grace of the dog’s natural movements in a manner reflective of the musicality of the chosen accompaniment…. The Dogs Can Dance Challenge® goal is to encourage training of dogs at all stages of their lives and further educate the handlers toward future success.” For more information and the complete mission statement, visit http://dogscandance.com/.

Even dogs that are overweight, retired from other sports, elderly, or have physical limitations can enjoy the sport of canine freestyle. In fact, moving to the beat of music can help shed pounds and increase strength and fitness (for both dog and owner). You can tailor your routine to make it safe for your dog. Check with your veterinarian to make sure that your dog will remain healthy as you train and compete in canine freestyle.

Freestyle began as a dog sport in the late 1980s. It seems to have begun almost simultaneously in several countries. There is no one “founder” of the sport. In Canada in 1991, the first canine freestyle organization, Musical Canine Sports International, was created.

Getting ready to choreograph your first canine freestyle routine? You will need to mix a wide variety of moves together in a smooth routine, taking into account your dog’s strong and weak points. Get help from instructors and the internet while creating that first routine. Check out this article on the subject from the Canine Freestyle Federation, Inc. website: http://www.canine-freestyle.org/articles_choreographyhowto.asp

Heelwork-to-music (HTM) is a category of musical freestyle that involves having the handler and dog very close to each other throughout the routine. In World Canine Freestyle Organization events, heelwork-to-music is described on their website as a routine where “on all moves, the dog and handler team should move as one entity throughout the routine, displaying heelwork and creativity in the many positions and behaviors possible in HTM.” There should be no weaving between the handler’s legs or distance work in HTM events. In other canine freestyle classes, a wider variety of moves is allowed.

Interesting fact: according to their website, the World Canine Freestyle Organization (see “W”) is “a 501 (c)(3) public charity, the only organization to achieve this status in the world of dog/people sports.”

Join facebook freestyle groups (just type in canine musical freestyle and you’ll find many options) or attend seminars to help you learn more about the sport.

Keep freestyle training fun, according to enthusiast Jan Mayr, who has been involved in the sport for 15 years. Happy training sessions will be reflected in upbeat, lively performances.

Leashes are allowed in most organizations in the beginning levels, but more advanced levels of competition require off-leash work.

Musical Dog Sport Association is another organization that sanctions canine freestyle activities. Their mission statement is “is to advance the sport of canine freestyle and to share the joy of the canine/human bond achieved through positive training, enhanced by the artistry of music and choreography. Created by freestylers for freestylers, the MDSA defines Canine Freestyle as a dog sport in which training, teamwork, music and movement combine to create an artistic, choreographed performance highlighting the canine partner in a manner that celebrates the unique qualities of each individual dog. It is built upon the foundation of a positive working relationship of a dog and handler team.” To read the rest of their statement and learn more about MDSA visit http://www.musicaldogsport.org/about

Never correct …. Dogs can create too,” says Mayr.

Organize work sessions around learning behaviors first and then create your routine by sequencing those behaviors together,” says Mayr.

Pairs and team classes are offered in some organizations so you can dance with your friends and their dogs too!

Quiet? Not at a canine freestyle event! While competing dogs are generally quiet, the music isn’t.

Rhythm is significant. Dogs generally have a comfortable, rhythmic trot. Fit your music and routine to your dog’s rhythm rather than to yours.

Selecting just the right music for your dog is important. Choose one that matches with the rhythm of the dog as he moves. Music that suits the dog is important. But don’t choose a song you hate. You’re going to be listening to it many times!

Titles are available in all the freestyle sanctioning organizations.

Uncomfortable dancing in public? No worries! While the handler can dance in many freestyle organizations’ events, it’s not a requirement and it may, in fact, distract from your dog’s performance. Remember that freestyle is about a partnership between a human and a dog.

Video competitions are often an option in canine freestyle. In fact, some freestyle organizations, like Dogs Can Dance, are only (or almost only) based on videos alone; they do not hold “live” events.

World Canine Freestyle Organization, Inc. (http://www.worldcaninefreestyle.org/) is one of several organizations that sanctions canine freestyle events. The WCFO was founded by Patie Ventre, who created it with 13 other people in 1999. The mission statement of the WCFO, according to their website, is “WCFO, INC. is a non-profit corporation, founded to globally promote the joys and fun of responsible pet ownership through musical canine freestyle, both as a sport and an entertainment medium.”

X marks the spot where you can get started in canine freestyle! The Canine Freestyle Federation lists clubs that offer classes here: http://canine-freestyle.org/guilds_class.asp, but if your area doesn’t have a club listed, check with local obedience clubs and schools. Just because a club isn’t listed on an organization’s website doesn’t mean it won’t have great freestyle classes. Don’t forget to look on facebook for clubs near you as well.

You can create freestyle routines for places other than competitions. Mayr says, “Many do freestyle for therapy dog visits.” Can you imagine doing a freestyle routine for an auditorium full of school children? Or in a nursing home lobby? Or for spectators at the county fair?

Zillions of dogs, handlers, and spectators like canine freestyle. Maybe you and your dog will too!

Special thanks to Jan Mayr for her assistance with this article.

A version of this article first appeared in DogSport Magazine.

Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa offers dog training, puppy training, working with aggressive dogs and rehabilitating fearful and shy dogs.  In addition we offer cat training, agility, pushball and dock jumping. Courteous Canine, Inc. DogSmith of Tampa is a full service dog school that offers doggie day care, pet sitting, group classes and boarding!

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