Category Archives: Dog Health and Safety

Animal Abuse Harms People Too

If you are reading this blog then I may safely assume you are an animal lover, but sometimes love is not enough. Sometimes advocacy through direction action is required.

I post this as an urgent call to action to help pass animal abuse legislation which Humane Society of the United States (Wisconsin) state director Melissa Tedrowe declared in her testimony to be a “gold standard” law. Current law has significant loopholes, as I heard Senator Wanggaard declare in a Senate hearing.

Advocates for the humane treatment of animals (Photo: HSUS)
Advocates for the humane treatment of animals (Photo: HSUS)

For the past few weeks I have supported HSUS as they moved companion bills through the Assembly and Senate hearings, greatly strengthening Wisconsin animal abuse law.

I testified at both hearings along with numerous other citizens and the bills passed with bipartisan unanimous support. Now they sit in the office of majority leader Senator Fitzgerald. The legislative session ends in two days and if this bill is not on the schedule by Tuesday, March 20…it will die.

If this bill dies, so may countless animals and human beings.

You see, there is a link between animal abuse and human violence. I know this as I have been researching the subject for an upcoming BARKS From the Guild article and the evidence is very clear. Those who begin by abusing, torturing and killing animals too often end up doing the same to children, spouses, engaging in mass shootings and serial murder.

The massacre at Columbine high school was a catalyst for what is now a perpetual stream of school shootings across the United States. The Columbine murderers first engaged in the abuse and murder of wild and domestic animals.

In Milwaukee (Wisconsin) Jeffrey Dahmer first abused and killed animals, before he began a killing spree at age 18, consuming his many victims.

Read full article >

Goodbye Food Allergies, Hello Play Training!

Angelica Steinker was interviewed for a cutting edge new product that offers hope for allergies.

“This is Power, a seven-year-old purebred Border Collie who up until recently has continuously suffered from both environmental and food allergies. As a result, he would experience rapid weight loss and frequent vomiting. A friend of mine found out about AnimalBiome’s unique therapies.”

Read the full story here >

Quality of Life for Blind/Deaf Dogs

By Debbie Bauer

I receive a lot of great ideas for new blog posts – Thank you so much for those.  I’m always looking for ideas to write about that will be useful to each of you as readers.  One idea that truly intrigued me was to discuss what quality of life a blind and deaf dog can have.  I think it caught my interest because I had never thought about my dogs not having a good quality of life.  I began to think about how we measure quality of life and why.

I have had many dogs in my life over the years, and there have been times when I have made the decision to have them euthanized when they no longer had a good quality of life.  Of course, this was always based on my opinion, the veterinarian’s opinion, and the fact that I knew those dogs very well.  Pain is perhaps the biggest reason I would make this decision.  If the pain could not be controlled and if it was affecting the dog’s daily activities.  If she no longer showed any interest in the activities that she used to love – then, in my opinion there is a loss of quality of life.

Read full article >

How to Teach Your Deaf (and Blind) Dog to Wake Up Gently

 

Here is a wonderful blog by PPG member Debbie Bauer on how to teach a blind or deaf dog to wake up gently.


There is a myth that deaf dogs can be “dangerous” because they will bite when they are startled or woken up.

Could this ever happen? Yes, it could. But it could also happen with a dog that can hear just fine.

Does it happen a lot? No. Most deaf dogs are no threat when startled.

Can this scenario be prevented? Yes, definitely! You can teach your deaf dog to wake up easily and happily. By teaching this skill to your new dog, you can prevent this issue from developing.

Start training when your dog is awake and paying attention to you. Let your dog see you reach towards it. Touch your dog and then pop a wonderful treat into its mouth immediately. Don’t wait to see what your dog will do. There should be no lag time. Just touch and pop the treat into its mouth. Make these really special treats. You want your dog to really look forward to being touched.

If your dog is also blind, give it a moment to become aware that you are nearby before you touch at this stage of teaching.  Touch gently and quickly give a treat.  In the beginning, give your dog a moment to know you are there, sniff your hand, etc, before touching.  You can progress in the same way as working with a deaf dog.

Read full article here >