Animal Abuse Harms People Too

If you are reading this blog then I may safely assume you are an animal lover, but sometimes love is not enough. Sometimes advocacy through direction action is required.

I post this as an urgent call to action to help pass animal abuse legislation which Humane Society of the United States (Wisconsin) state director Melissa Tedrowe declared in her testimony to be a “gold standard” law. Current law has significant loopholes, as I heard Senator Wanggaard declare in a Senate hearing.

Advocates for the humane treatment of animals (Photo: HSUS)
Advocates for the humane treatment of animals (Photo: HSUS)

For the past few weeks I have supported HSUS as they moved companion bills through the Assembly and Senate hearings, greatly strengthening Wisconsin animal abuse law.

I testified at both hearings along with numerous other citizens and the bills passed with bipartisan unanimous support. Now they sit in the office of majority leader Senator Fitzgerald. The legislative session ends in two days and if this bill is not on the schedule by Tuesday, March 20…it will die.

If this bill dies, so may countless animals and human beings.

You see, there is a link between animal abuse and human violence. I know this as I have been researching the subject for an upcoming BARKS From the Guild article and the evidence is very clear. Those who begin by abusing, torturing and killing animals too often end up doing the same to children, spouses, engaging in mass shootings and serial murder.

The massacre at Columbine high school was a catalyst for what is now a perpetual stream of school shootings across the United States. The Columbine murderers first engaged in the abuse and murder of wild and domestic animals.

In Milwaukee (Wisconsin) Jeffrey Dahmer first abused and killed animals, before he began a killing spree at age 18, consuming his many victims.

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Thunderphobia in Dogs

Thunderphobia is the fear of thunderstorms and it can be severe enough to make a dog’s life miserable.  It may be more common than you know.

At least 20% of dogs suffer noise phobias including thunderphobia, according to ethologist Dr. Karolina Westlund, Ph.D.  There are about 80,000,000 dogs in the United States and if 20% suffer thunderphobia the scale of the problem is enormous.

It may be even greater, as Zazie Todd, Ph.D. wrote in Companion Animal Psychology in 2013.

“Dogs that responded badly to fireworks tended to also react to thunder and gunshots. They were also more likely to be older. Dogs that responded to thunder were more likely to be owned by males (although this may be a response bias), would also react to fireworks, gunshots and loud noises on TV, and tended to be afraid of traffic. Dogs that were afraid of gunshots tended to also react to fireworks and cars back-firing, and were more likely to be male and older.”

Thunderstorms worried Jake
Thunderstorms worried Jake

Of the five Labradors I lived with, Jake suffered thunderphobia from the day we adopted him at 18 months of age.  He fell into the 20% category of unlucky dogs.

It changed our life in that we had to become proactive pet guardians and change our own behavior in order to get him through storms.  He was also fearful of distant fireworks and low flying planes.  The noisy world was an unpredictable and scary place for poor Jake.

That was years before I knew anything about training and behavior but we took him to the basement to avoid the flashes of lightning and played music to mask the thunder, playing games with him to keep him in a happy state of mind until the storm passed.

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Goodbye Food Allergies, Hello Play Training!

Angelica Steinker was interviewed for a cutting edge new product that offers hope for allergies.

“This is Power, a seven-year-old purebred Border Collie who up until recently has continuously suffered from both environmental and food allergies. As a result, he would experience rapid weight loss and frequent vomiting. A friend of mine found out about AnimalBiome’s unique therapies.”

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Quality of Life for Blind/Deaf Dogs

By Debbie Bauer

I receive a lot of great ideas for new blog posts – Thank you so much for those.  I’m always looking for ideas to write about that will be useful to each of you as readers.  One idea that truly intrigued me was to discuss what quality of life a blind and deaf dog can have.  I think it caught my interest because I had never thought about my dogs not having a good quality of life.  I began to think about how we measure quality of life and why.

I have had many dogs in my life over the years, and there have been times when I have made the decision to have them euthanized when they no longer had a good quality of life.  Of course, this was always based on my opinion, the veterinarian’s opinion, and the fact that I knew those dogs very well.  Pain is perhaps the biggest reason I would make this decision.  If the pain could not be controlled and if it was affecting the dog’s daily activities.  If she no longer showed any interest in the activities that she used to love – then, in my opinion there is a loss of quality of life.

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The Opposite of Force


by Eileen Anderson

Clara's pool provides enrichment she can choose when she wants

I think I’ve figured something out.

I continue to see the concept of choice bandied about the positive reinforcement-based training world. It can be a code word for a setup that includes negative reinforcement. “I’m going to do something physically unfamiliar or unpleasant to you and you have the choice of staying here and getting a piece of food or leaving and being relieved from whatever it is I’m doing.” I’ve suggested that this is not a laudable kind of choice; as trainers we can use our skills and take our time so that the dog doesn’t want to leave in the first place.

It can also refer to human-centric preference tests, many of which are subject to extreme bias.

But here’s my new realization. I think we have grabbed hard onto the concept of choice because it seems like the opposite of force.

  • Instead of pushing the dog’s butt down into a sit, I don’t. The dog now has a choice.
  • Instead of restraining the dog for nail trims, I don’t. The dog now has a choice.
  • Instead of pulling the dog away from the fire hydrant by his leash and collar, I let him sniff, or I give a cue for another behavior that I will strongly reinforce. He has a choice.

But there is a semantic mismatch here. Force and choice are not opposites.

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